×

Search by product name or hair type/concerns

by Better Not Younger October 21, 2020

Usually, we can expect to shed about 100 hairs each day. It’s part of the natural balance of your hair biology. Your hair follicles go through a cycle that includes growth, transition, and rest — but for many women, it may seem like their follicles are spending too much time resting. When your growth cycle is interrupted, and more hair falls out then grows in, hair loss occurs.

Many women suffer in silence with their hair loss, changing their hairstyles to disguise thin spots; however, female hair loss is not uncommon at all. In fact, more than half of U.S. women will experience noticeable hair loss along the top of their heads as they reach menopause. This hair loss type is called female-pattern hair loss (FPHL) and affects about 30 million American women, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

The way it affects women is different from how it impacts men — this is because many women feel their hair communicates their femininity, personality, and attractiveness to the world. Learning how to prevent hair loss is crucial for many women to regain their self-confidence, quality of life, and emotional well-being.

The Hair Growth Cycle

Hair fibers begin their existences in tiny skin pockets called follicles. Their life cycles involve three growth stages: anagen, catagen, and telogen.

  • Active growth or anagen stage — Your hair grows for two to seven years during the anagen stage. For maximum growth, your hair should remain in this phase for as long as possible. Often, genetics will cut it short.
  • Transition or catagen stage — This two- to three-week stage is a transitionary phase between anagen and telogen phases. During this short period, your hair bulb is forced toward your scalp and disconnects from its blood source.
  • Resting or telogen stage — No new cell division happens during the three- to nine-month telogen phase. This means the length of your locks remains the same over this stage. The follicle’s dermal papilla uses this stage to "refill" the hair matrix with growth cells in preparation for the anagen phase. Eventually, the resting club hair is shed, and a new hair grows up through the follicle.

Why Hair Loss Happens

There’s no single cause for hair loss. For example, there are as many as 30 medical conditions that can cause it, in addition to:

  • Lifestyle factors
  • Stress
  • Genetics
  • Diet
  • Drugs and medical treatments
  • Tight hairstyles
  • Hair products that contain harsh ingredients

Hormone imbalances related to aging and thyroid conditions can also trigger hair to fall out.

Hair Loss and Aging

Age-related changes in dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels can lead to FPHL or androgenetic alopecia. DHT is a male hormone found primarily in our blood but is also common in sweat and sebum. It is a testosterone derivative that binds with hair follicles to trigger FPHL. In addition to interrupting the growth cycle on some of your follicles, DHT shrinks the rest of them, causing them to push out fine, wispy-textured strands.

FPHL is different from the balding and receding hairline men experience. As women, we first encounter minor thinning, then a wider-than-normal midline part, and ultimately hair loss across our entire scalp. Female pattern baldness varies among women due to disparities in hormone levels and genetics. If your mom or sisters have FPHL, you are likely to experience it as well.

Preventing Hair Loss

Although thinning hair is a natural part of the aging process, there are steps you can take to prevent or even reverse hair loss. Some of these strategies work by stimulating your follicles back into their active growth phase, causing new hair to emerge. Others aim to prevent hair loss from happening in the first place.

Consider the following hair loss solutions:

  • Minoxidil — Minoxidil is a synthetic drug thought to promote hair growth by widening blood vessels. This may allow more blood, oxygen, and nutrients to reach the follicles. It may truncate the telogen phase, causing those resting hairs to shed and be replaced by thicker strands in a new anagen phase.
  • Anti-androgens — Prescription anti-androgen medications like spironolactone can prevent hair loss caused by excess testosterone and DHT. They do this by either reducing the production of these hormones or blocking their effects. Talk to your doctor about potential side effects.
  • Protect your hair with Heat Protection & Taming Spray To avoid pulling your hair out at the roots, brush gently and steer clear of tight braids or ponytails. Hairdryers and curling irons can lead to breakage and further hair loss, so protect your strands with BNY’s No Remorse Heat Protection & Taming Spray before applying the heat.
  • Nourish your locks with Volumizing Conditioner — Another potential DHT blocker is oleanolic acid, a compound found in olive oil and other plant-based foods. BNY’s Wake Up Call Volumizing Conditioner contains a topical oleanolic acid to add to your hair loss prevention strategy.
  • Use Fortifying Hair & Scalp Serum — Better Not Younger’s Superpower Fortifying Hair & Scalp Serum supplies vitamins and minerals to your aging scalp. It contains ginger, caffeine, and niacinamide to stimulate the blood vessels that feed your follicles naturally. It also contains DHT-suppressing oleanolic acid, to protect your follicles, helping you grow a fuller, healthier mane.
  • Try BNY’s NEW massaging serum applicator — Better Not Younger’s Superpower Liquid Comb Massaging Serum Applicator was designed to be used with BNY’s Fortifying Hair & Scalp Serum. This smooth applicator has aluminum ball-tipped dispensers, widely spaced to stimulate scalp microcirculation and distribute the serum closer to your roots.
  • Boost your minerals and vitamins intake with Hair Fortifying Vitamins — Sometimes, as we age, our bodies cannot absorb enough of this essential mineral. Look for a daily supplement that contains minerals and vitamins like BNY’s Significant Other Hair Fortifying Vitamins.

Prevent Hair Loss with BNY’s Holistic Line of Hair Care Solutions

There are few things more alarming for most of us than finding an increasing amount of hair in the drain or an ever-widening hair part. Aging is inevitable, and now that you understand how it impacts your hair and scalp, you can do something about it. Make healthy lifestyle choices and use holistic hair and scalp solutions from Better Not Younger.

Stop by our Shop page to check out our full product line, including our NEW trial-sized Volume + Strength Minis Discovery Kit and our NEW ultra-deluxe Nourish + Restore Thicker, Fuller Hair System.


Better Not Younger
Better Not Younger

Author


2 Responses

Veronica

October 30, 2020

Since I started using your products my hair has stopped falling out in scary amounts. Each time I use these products my hair feels amazing and the fall out is less and less.

Lea

October 22, 2020

Love your products! Just started to use them one month ago and I notice a difference. I use the serum, the heat protector, which I absolutely love, and the butter. Thanks for all the information on email.

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.

Also in The Better Blog

Is It Better to Put Serum on Wet or Dry Hair?
Is It Better to Put Serum on Wet or Dry Hair?

by Better Not Younger November 21, 2020

Many of us use serums as part of our daily skincare routines to smooth wrinkles, reduce age spots, lift bags, and moisturize our face and neck. Just as vital is scalp and hair care serums. Quality hair and scalp serums can curb thinning, hair loss, breakage, and other age-related issues. However, just as the different types of serums vary, so do the different ways to apply them to get the best results. To get the most out of the hair care products you purchase, make sure you are using them correctly. Let's look at the different types of serums and whether it is better to put each on wet or dry hair.

What Does Serum Do to Your Hair? Serum, or hair serum, is a liquid styling solution used to add shine, reduce frizz, and moisturize your hair.
What Does Serum Do to Your Hair?

by Eduardo Mendoza November 14, 2020 2 Comments

Our hair is more delicate and brittle than it once was, so who could blame us for being cautious about the hair products we use on it? After all, it’s kept our scalps protected for untold years and has even become integrated with our identity. Many of us feel we wouldn’t be who we are without it.
Can My Hair Benefit from a Scalp Massage? A scalp massage is similar to a massage you might receive for your back, neck, or body. It utilizes gentler pressure to protect your follicles, and, unlike a body massage, you can perform it on yourself.
Can My Hair Benefit from a Scalp Massage?

by Eduardo Mendoza November 11, 2020

If you have ever experienced a scalp massage, you know how relaxing it can be. When we get our hair shampooed at the salon, the stylist often gives us a simultaneous massage. A scalp massage is essentially the kneading and rubbing of your head, a profoundly calming process that relaxes your skull and neck muscles.